Top Beaches of the East Coast


By Gunjan Sewhani

Rarely a day goes by that I don’t feel blessed to live in New York City — whether it is the easy convenience of the grocery store down the block that is open 24/7, or the ability to hail a cab with a wave of a hand, reasons to be in love with this city unfurl at every corner. One of the very few drawbacks we do face as Manhattanites is those scorching summer days in the city — the days that no amount of time in air conditioning or cool cocktails at happy hour can help you cool off. Dotting your summer calendars with weekend-long beach getaways is always a good way to combat this: now is the time to start planning! An array of beautiful beaches is just a road trip or quick flight away. Here are our top picks for beach getaways along the Eastern Coast.

The Spa at Trump Soho


By Anna Ryan

The people of New York City are always in a hurry. It’s a never ending cycle of waking up early, going to work, attending meetings, eating dinner then going to bed. The hustle and bustle of the city never dies, and by the end of the day, everyone is exhausted.  What is one to do to take a break from the hectic work cycle?  Pamper yourself at The Spa at Trump!

Paradise Found: The Village Latch Inn


By Isaiah Negron

The understated chic of the historic Village Latch Inn in Southampton made it a favorite of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, who championed both the preservation and restoration of the White House and the turn of the century “cottages” on the East End where she summered as child. Jackie admired the architecture of the Latch, which was built in 1901 and is attributed to the legendary architect Stanford White. Jackie wanted the buildings protected for future generations. In 1974, Marta and Martin White fell in love with this charming property in the Village of Southampton and bought it. The Whites shared Jackie’s vision of the conservation of The Latch, located at 101 Hill Street amidst over 5 acres of lush lawns and gardens. Originally, the property, boarded by tall privet hedges that to this day create a quiet oasis in the heart of the town, only featured the magnificent main house. Preservationists by nature, the couple also purchased the Terry Cottage, which was part of the former Irving Hotel across the street, as well as the homestead buildings and glass greenhouse from the adjacent Merrill Lynch estate, and relocated them to the Village Latch. In doing this, the Whites saved these important structures from the fate of the Irving Hotel, which was burned to the ground as a fireman’s exercise.  “We feel we did our part to help save the architectural authenticity of Southampton,” said Marta.

Peconic County: Just a Myth?


By Jerry Kremer

There are all kinds of events that take place over an anticipated period of time. Locusts are usually on the way every seven years. The Cicada bug makes an appearance every 17 years. Halley’s Comet is said to flash through the skies every 86 years. And just about once every ten years a group of true believers will call for the creation of Peconic County.

Eat A Meal with Natasha or Dance the Pounds Off with Imelda


By Barry Bassis

What’s with all the plays with Russian titles this past season? There was “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike,” “Nikolai and the Others,” and “Natasha, Pierre And The Great Comet of 1812.” The last one is a musical based on part of Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” and is being performed in Kazino, a supper club erected just for this show. Both the venue and the musical are worth taking in.

American Music (and Musicians) For The Ages


By Barry Bassis

We all know that great music lasts forever, but some musicians seem to live, and even perform, into their old age.

When a new CD, “Magic 101,” arrived from Frank Wess, I immediately checked for the date of the recording, assuming it must have been made decades ago. Yet, the session took place in June 2011. Born in 1922, he performed at Birdland earlier this year to celebrate his 91st birthday. Wess was a mainstay of the Count Basie band during his ten years there. That group became know as the “Two Franks” band because of the two saxophonist-composer-arrangers Frank Wess and Frank Foster. In 2007 he received the American Jazz Masters Fellowship award from The National Endowment for the Arts. And what does Wess sound like on the CD? Smooth as silk. Wess plays tenor saxophone and, never a flamboyant musician, he is mellower than ever, on evergreens like “The Very Thought of You” and “Easy Living.” He also sustains a gentle swing, with the help of a first-rate group: Kenny Barron on piano, Kenny Davis on bass and Winard Harper on drums. This is an album you can put on to relax after a stressful day. Incidentally, the tile of the new album is a reference to the fact that Magic is the nickname his band mates gave to Wess. My only complaint about the CD is that Wess doesn’t play flute, an instrument on which he was one of the jazz pioneers.

Children & Technology


By Dr. Jo Webber

Children are still often times the most tech savvy in the house.  Mobile Internet, for example, is a swiftly evolving technology and its fastest adopters are children.  In fact, in a recent survey by Piper Jaffrey we learn that the no one uses the mobile Internet more than the under 18 year old.  Almost 80% of both male and female teenagers are shopping online and 50% say that social media directly influences their purchases with Facebook currently being the most important, followed closely by Twitter and Instagram.