Birds of a Frotta

By Rory Winston Shortly after Flatiron’s Ciano closed, the genius of a restaurateur, Stratis Morfogen, insouciantly announced, “Well, I’m going back to Italian-American” – this after realizing that his renowned purist of a chef, Shea Gallante, was taking himself out of the picture. The comment, unlike the resulting cuisine, could have been taken with a…

Mexico’s Medina

By Rory Winston Medina has founded yet another Mecca – admittedly, an irrelevant pun given that Julian Medina is a Mexican chef while the new Mecca being referred to is a third restaurant in a growing New York based franchise known as Toloache. Still, there is something religious about Medina’s following – especially if one…

Palette to Palate

By Rory Winston Think Chelsea;’ it’s more than likely you’ve already started imagining yourself strolling down a gallery-riddled boulevard with colorful personalities splashed on for good measure. If, however, you’re trying to grasp the history that went into making this area what it is today then there are certainly more revealing and impressionistic journeys to…

From Michelin to Michelin


By Rory Winston

Roadside clam shacks crossed with culinary aspiration? You’ve seen the likes of the former in films celebrating the 50’s by the coast: Gas stations with Coca Cola signs dangling precariously in the wind, Ice cubes advertised in handwritten cutouts off some seaside interstate, a badly drawn lobster with the words Open till Sunset, and always the phrase Extra Fancy grotesquely stuck like a label on something as innocuous as canned soup.

Aesthetics Sans Frontières

by Kenji Nakamura

Dr. Kassir, The Man Behind the Faces

By Rory Winston  |  Photography by Kenji Nakamura

Oh darling, I absolutely adore that new dress; and where ever did you buy those lovely lips and matching breasts?” Yes, things have certainly changed – especially on the West Coast and Down South where it has become a sign of affluence to undergo rather exaggerated cosmetic procedures. The more pronounced the mutation, the better the buzz. As a colleague of mine in Tinsel Town recently stated, “Remember when ‘porn celebrity’ was still an oxymoron… way back, before people thought of their bodies as compromised versions of ‘silicone sex dolls?’”

Fortunately, New York has remained its own aloof island trapped forever between elite European aesthetics and East Coast self-consciousness. With a sensibility at one remove from the rest of America, savvy locals embrace an understated style with a functionalist bent. Do we want to look better? Unless your only means of employment is a cardboard sign, a cup and a forlorn look, the answer is a resounding yes. Do we want others to conclude that vanity was the motivating factor? In a city that shuns ostentation and celebrates the sublime, aspiring to perfection is hardly a carte blanche for overt revamping. So although the zeitgeist insists ‘faux youth is preferable to aging,’ broadcasting rejuvenation is frowned upon by the smart set.

Few are as aware of this ‘subdued cosmopolitan ideal’ as Dr. Ramtin Kassir, the triple-board certified facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon who is also an otolaryngologist, a specialist in head and neck surgery and an expert in sleep medicine. With extensive field experience in cosmetic, endoscopic and laser surgery, Dr. Kassir is our very own Ponce de León with a space age GPS – he is a man who has not only found the much sought-for fountain of youth, but has managed to bottle it in a discrete and tasteful manner.

Scrumptious Stories

By Rory Winston “The taste is in my mouth a little,” responded Abraham Lincoln in 1860 regarding his intentions to run for President. The comment was made shortly after he gave a speech at Cooper Union. Few are aware, however, that the most likely sensation still lingering on the esteemed candidate’s palate was the afterglow…

Use, Muse & Amuse


By Rory Winston

'Temple of the muses’ – so sacred, so much grandeur, all that pressure attached to a single word: ‘museum.’ The fact that many are inspired to quote the etymology of the institution, and spend hours raptly invoking the atypical way in which they experience these renowned bastions of culture means there are way too few actually attending.

It is something one associates to foreign countries, something one sets aside a special time of the year to do. It is, for many, an intellectual obligation, a cultural necessity, a way in which to properly pay one’s respects to those who have contributed to our world; it is, in short, a visit to the cemetery.

Note: there is no such thing as a special ‘museum mood.’ There are as many different museums as there are emotional states. And, as sacrilegious as it may sound, museums are downright entertaining. They are there as much for our amusement as for our education.